ROBERT LLOYD Exhibition East Central Community Ctr.

In This exhibit was first seen at the Spokane downtown library from January through March. Now we will be moving two E. Central Community Center we were able find it’s permanent home. But it will be made available to other institutions and galleries if you’re interested contact Robert Lloyd at rdlloyd@comcast.net.

Coming soon to East Central Community Ctr. 500 S. Stone.

If You Really Knew Me you’d know that I’m the Black guy photographing your events and meetings.  If You Really Knew Me you’d know I am a supporter of community building (4comculture.com).  If You Really Knew Me you’d know I taught my photography students that good photographs have four components.

This exhibition has

  • Impact – size 4 x 5 feet
  • Technique – cutting edge technology: CherryPIX video
  • Design/Composition – bold colors, striking brush strokes and textures, interaction
  • Content – in depth storytelling, stereotype blowing, media mixing, community building

If you would like to take part and meet new friends, you’ll visit East Central Community Ctr. 500 S. Stone Spokane WA for First Thur each month at10 AM coffee discussion.

IF YOU REALLY KNEW ME Stories of Survivors and Warriors.

EXHIBITION

This exhibit we’ll be House & display at the E. Central Community Ctr.  May.

 

This will be a traveling exhibit and can be made available for exhibitions at your gallery or institution. contact Robert Lloyd at rdlloyd@comcast.net

Photographs by Robert Lloyd

Video by Doug Dalton and DaShawn Bedford

Wendy Levy for The Alliance for Media Arts + Culture

A collaborative, interactive photography exhibition in honor of Human Trafficking Awareness month in Spokane, these photographs were created with local women survivors and warriors. We hope these images and stories raise awareness, engagement and political will, so all those still in risk may find safety and freedom.

A project of The Alliance for Media Arts + Culture, The Spokane Human Rights Commission, Community-Minded Television,The Jonah Project and Spokane Arts Supply

It Must Be Black History Month

How I See It : Waiting For Black People Is Like Waiting For Godot

Waiting for “My Spokane Black People” is like Waiting For GODot. Must we die first? Life After Trump. It has been difficult getting Spokane’s African American community involved in social justice concerns. Here’s something easy you can do. Come see talented young actress Regina Carerre at the September showing of Waiting for Godot.

The last time we, Bob and Diane Lloyd, were waiting for Godot was in the mid-1980’s at 123 Arts at 123 S. Madison with Dave Gustafson & his wife, Nancy Malloy, Johnnie Montgomery, Frank Ponikvar, Ralph Busch, Tim Behrens, Tom Davis, John Schneider, Jennifer LaRue, Brian Flick. 123 Arts was on the south side of the railroad tracks across from the Otis Hotel in another historic Spokane brick warehouse, now a parking lot for condos.

The Venue: Terrain

Don’t miss the mid-2010’s version 40 years later on the north side of the tracks at 304 W. Pacific. Watch for more Terrain events at the Washington Cracker building “changing our region one artist at a time”.

I witnessed a great performance by the Gonzaga University Dept. of Theater and Dance.

The Acting : The Cast

You should have seen Regina Carerre who played Pozzo. She is a senior at Gonzaga University with an English major and a double minor in Criminal Justice and Theatre. And Jaron Fuglie as the slave Lucky gave the most tremendous monologue when asked to demonstrate that he could think.

If you did not see it, it’s OK, Godot never showed. Come see it September 7 or 9 at 7:30 pm or September 10 at 2:00 pm.

The Set : The Art

The outdoor set IS the environment and changes with the forces upon it. The installation artist J. J. McCracken says that it “responds to adjacent elements: the constant flow of materials via the BNSF Railway and the history of the Washington Cracker building. Embedded objects refer to the transformation of raw material into goods through refinement and manufacture. Items in the junk pile suggest transportation, labor, communication, marketing, demand, consumption and waste when a hill of earth material slowly weathers, washing over and reclaiming them. The tree, questionably dead, loosely references beetle kill ravaging forests as climate change warms the North American woods. other referents include the Great pacific Garbage Patch.

The Trains

A moving part of the set, we wait for the next train. Part of the ambient sounds of police sirens, ambulances, motorcycles that weave into the stream of the sound design which featured selections from Insect Courage (2016) & Califone (1998) by Califone and Guitars Tuned to Air Conditioners (2016) by Tim Rutili & Craig Ross.

Says Director Charles M. Pepiton, “We are entangled. Climate changes. Leaves grow like ashes as the BNSF railway threads its way west and east rolling pipelines of oil, coal, and lumber. We wait. ‘But at this place, at this moment of time, all mankind is us, whether we like it or not.'”

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Building The Community We Want

I have never Interviewed the owners but I have visited 2 to 3 times per week for many years. This is where the First Thursday Coffee group meets. I would
not like to put words in the owner’s mouth. From what I have seen and felt these local people support community building. I like the idea of unsolicited
public support. I just want to tell my friends about good folks in our community.

 

What You Can Do – What He Does

This is another example of action coming out of our First Thursday Coffee discussions at the Rocket Market.

 

Submitted by Dr. Barb Brock on behalf of Anthony Stevenson, aka artist Salik Seville

Just think about what you can do to help people…
Artist Salik Seville, (aka Anthony Stevenson), originally from Memphis and a Navy veteran, has been through tough times and knows what it’s like to be homeless, but now has found his place in Spokane. Salik uses his art to showcase what he’s been going through, and offers hope for others to push through. “I just want to inspire others and do my part,” he says. “You might be having hard times or come from a hard background, but you should always think about what you can do to help people.” His work has been showcased at the downtown Spokane Library during the month of February for the past two years. Here is Anthony’s statement for 2017:
“My friends, every year I start out the New Year with an exhibition. I’ve been fortunate to have several artists join me including Denise Robinson, Sage Caberllero, Rachel Dolozal and Jay Cousin, who are contributing their time and talent to help our community.
This is something that means a lot to me. When I first started doing this it was my way of speaking through art about how I see humans. If you are in the area, come check out the art and if you see something you like, all you need is a bag of fresh food and a bag of hygiene products, i.e., hand towels, deodorant, etc to acquire a piece of art. There’s no limit. Meals on wheels and health care for homeless veterans will receive the food, and Spokane county veterans will receive the hygiene products. I will also have some paintings for sale to help the YWCA at the library here in downtown Spokane.  I would like to express my gratitude to Mrs. Barb Brock – thank you for getting involved – your help is so appreciated and will never be forgotten. Here’s to good energy, art, and action. Love can change the world.”        Salik Seville

How I Saw It From the Edge: Japan

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_dsc0057a-test1 _dsc0130-1Learn from others in other countries. Keep up your friendships abroad, or make new friends abroad. The present difficulties here are an element of a general trend. And no country is going to find a solution by itself. Make sure you and your family have passports.

I spent this summer renewing a relationship with a friend from Japan, staying with his family, and getting to know his country. You can look forward to seeing more photographs from Japan on the Gallery page.

Anthony Boccaccio EXHIBIT AT INTERPLAYERS THEATER

Chris Crisostomo

INTERPLAYERS THEATRE  174 S. HOWARD ST. SPOKANE WA
Featuring internationally acclaimed photographer, artist and adventurer Anthony Boccaccio. Anthony began his photographic career with National Geographic Magazine in 1971. He has recently published a photographic book about the search for gold in the Amazonian Jungle.

Folks,
The opening of Tony’s exhibition was superb in so many ways. Tony, always
volubile and socially engaging, was in top form, greeting the numerous attendees and sharing anecdotes about the images and their creation. The images are wonderful, it is especially encouraging to view this exhibit here in Spokane. Chris Crisostomo, who modeled for several of the images, is a personable fellow who is exceptionally graceful in his movements and gestures… just a treat to see him at various times in the evening. No wonder Tony asked him to model.

If you missed the opening, please be aware that you can view the images any time during the day when the Interplayers box office is open… it is free and open to the public.
Amazing visions, excellently executed, you owe it to yourself to take the time…
Running, at least, through November.

Jay Cousins