How I Saw It: My Path To Tolerance

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“A Path To Tolerance”, selections from over a decade of quiet observations, will be on exhibit at the EWU Downtown Gallery in Cheney Washington. It includes the exhibit “If You Really Knew Me”. 

Below is a review of “If You Really Knew Me” by Jeff Mooring.

I am seldom moved enough to feel compelled to write about art. Somewhere in my head it’s the equivalent of trying to tell someone about a great song, instead of just playing it for them or droning on and on about a game that happened days ago. But compelled I am. The art in this case is the exceptionally well-conceived and executed work of a longtime friend Mr. Robert Lloyd.

Let me start by saying it’s one thing to capture the beauty and energy of a subject which he’s done, but Mr. Lloyd has surpassed that with his vivid, brilliantly colored, larger than life portraits of several women. His subjects, these eye-catching women, are of varying races, ages and stations in life. It’s my understanding that Robert achieved this dazzling effect with some high-tech, modern day alchemy of photography and computer technology. The details of which are far beyond my pay grade and simply don’t matter much when standing in front of these works. But imagine if you would, you stand being transfixed by each portrait and then you’re made aware, as they say in the TV infomercials, “but wait there’s more”. With a quick and easy loading of an app called “Cherry Pix” you can simply aim your phone at a portrait and the image comes to life and you get to hear the story of triumph behind each and every one of these beautiful souls.

The technology I believe is called augmented reality. The film clips were captured, edited and packaged by a local team at Community Minded TV and this collaboration was backed by an entity called The Alliance for Media Arts + Culture. It all comes together seamlessly due to exceptional talents and craftsmanship to be one of the most moving experiences in art that I’ve seen in my 30 some odd years of viewing.

The show titled “If You Really Knew Me” is on exhibit at the East Central Community Center, 500 S. Stone, with plans to travel. Do yourself a favor and make some, take some time… to see this exceptional effort with stories and images that are moving and interconnected in ways that I won’t spoil for you. It costs nothing to enter and may well give you an experience of relating to the lives of these beautiful women that you won’t soon forget, and you’ll feel compelled to tell others about, as have I. If You Really Knew Me by Robert Lloyd
Jeff Mooring

Consensus On Values

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  “This” is our Values: Can We Get Consensus On This? We believe in justice for all * We believe in lifting up the disadvantaged * We believe in dismantling unjust criminalization systems * We believe in equal protection under … Continue reading

In the Heat of Battle We Can Often Lose Sight

Our heartfelt sympathies go out to those in the social justice arena suffering loss: Phillip Tyler, Mr. & Mrs. Poindexter, Rachel Dolezal, Children of the Movement.

Four things happened this week. A live Facebook post, a movie, and a couple of quotes.

  • In the movie Roman J. Israel, Esq. lost sight of his own personal needs in a 39 year struggle.
  • “We felt ‘called’ to save the world from racism, poverty, and war. We willingly risked our lives. But too seldom did we stop to recognize the burden we placed on our children.” Andrew Young

  • In the book CHILDREN OF THE MOVEMENT by John Blake the sons and daughters of MARTIN LUTHER KING JR., MALCOLM X, ELIJAH MUHAMMAD, GEORGE WALLACE, ANDREW YOUNG, JULIAN BOND, STOKELY CARMICHAEL, BOB MOSES, JAMES CHANEY, ELAINE BROWN, and others reveal how the civil rights movement tested and transformed their families.

 

This is also true for the families of today’s activists.Even those with the same goals don’t agree on the same tactics.

  • “Life is chaos. Be kind.”  Devon Waine Tyler
  • “Let’s be kind. You never know what someone Is going through.” Phillip Tyler

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Something You Can Do: Share At Dinner Tonight

Please browse the 4comculture.com menu for past articles.

YOU ARE PROTECTED ONLY IF WE THE  PROTECTED CLASSES ORGANIZE AND JOIN WITH  POOR PEOPLE  AND STOP THE POLICIES OF DONALD TRUMP.

This is a needed conversation every night. What strategies can we use to protect our freedoms, families, healthcare, environment, air, schools, our vote, and to stop wars.

START A FIRST THURSDAY COFFEE DISCUSSION GROUP WITH 5-10 OTHERS

Please come back to 4comculture.com to our browse menu for past articles.

Want To Build A Movement?

To get started tap here

 

Black Agenda Spokane Starts Mid-Monthly Meetings JOIN

If you read The Black Lens News or ask Sandy she can tell you when & where. So What’s Next?  What Support  is Needed?  Have A Seat At Your Own Table!!

What’s the Next Step?  Subscribe to the Black Lens News, write an article in the Black Lens News, follow 4comculture.com. 4comculture has been posting events and things you can do. Become media literate and savvy.  When your politicians hold town hall meetings show up. This past week there were two. If you weren’t there, here they are:

  1. Maria Cantwell’s Town Hall meeting:  https://www.facebook.com/senatorcantwell/videos/1987392528204307/
  2. Cathy McMorris Rodgers’ Town Hall meeting: https://www.facebook.com/ksps/videos/vb.60581587193/10154911576702194/?type=2&theater

Here are nine of the 20 people who showed up at Washington United Black Agenda Spokane.

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If you want to see who showed up at the town hall meetings, photos are posted at 4comculture.

Cathy McMorris Rodgers

Maria Cantwell

Maria Cantwell Gives Positive Responses at Town Hall

As you view photographs of activities here in Spokane on 4comculture.com you may notice that there are very few people of color or affected classes.

WHY?          Let us know in the Contacts / Comments form at the bottom of this post.

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Maria Cantwell Town Hall Video:

https://www.facebook.com/senatorcantwell/videos/1987392528204307/

Cathy McMorris Rodgers Town Hall Video:

https://www.facebook.com/ksps/videos/vb.60581587193/10154911576702194/?type=2&theater

Who was at Cathy McMorris Rodgers Town Hall?

http://4comculture.com/archives/11144

Want to know what Black people are doing?

http://4comculture.com/archives/11203

How I Saw It: Juneteenth Spokane 2017

Black man shot in the back. Jury acquits shooter. SCAR rallies, marches and protests with libations.

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Marchers marched past East Central Community Center where a farewell and retirement dinner for Chuck and Evelyn Anderton occurred. Two celebrations Juneteenth. One struggled for emancipation. The other celebrated emancipation from the job and escape from Spokane’s plantation. Enjoy your Retirement!

On the eve of the Juneteenth march some of the Black religious community gave awards and had a catfish dinner.  Excess catfish was sold to marchers at the BBQ concluding the rally, march and protest.

Trump: “I could shoot somebody and not lose voters”

“Oh, I love the old days, you know? You know what I hate?

There’s a guy, totally disruptive, throwing punches, we’re not allowed to punch back anymore. I love the old days.”                                                                                          -Trump

Freedom is not free! Nor is the Freedom of Information. Bushnell trial  transcript will cost over $3600 just to find out what happened. Who will help our community newspaper The Black Lens News get a transcript copy?

https://www.gofundme.com/black-lens-transcripts

No can speak for you but you. These are some of the people who showed up and spoke up.

Walk With Jordan Davis

Ron Davis, President and CEO, The Jordan Davis Foundation

President and CEO of The Jordan Davis Foundation, established in 2013 to provide education, travel opportunities, and support for America’s youth to increase their academic achievement and self-esteem.  Ron Davis was born in Harlem, moved to Atlanta in 1990 and to Jacksonville, FL in 2002. After his son Jordan’s untimely death November 23, 2013, which succeeded the death of Trayvon Martin, Ron Davis became a steadfast activist against the use of “stand your ground” laws to justify unjustified killings. He is a leader of the Black Lives Matter Movement and is on the planning committee for the US Human Rights Network.

In 2014, Mr Davis spoke at the United Nations Conference in Geneva, “prompting UN representatives to condemn policies of racial discrimination” against US people of color. In addition to responding to President Obama’s invitation to appear at the White House, Mr. Davis and Lucia McBath have shared their tragic story on such programs as CNN-Anderson Cooper 360, MSNBC, Good Morning America, The View with Whoopi Goldberg and the Katie Couric Show.

In demand as a speaker, he has presented to police chiefs, law enforcement, and audiences who have been swept away by the HBO documentary 3 1/2 Minutes, Ten Bullets. This is the movie that captures the murder of his son Jordan and the trials that followed. He bristles when he hears the excuse from a very well-armed assailant that the shooter “feared for (his) life.”

Panel:

Phillip Tyler – President, NAACP Spokane Chapter

Judge Aimee Maurer – Spokane County District Court

Chief Craig Meidl – Spokane Police Department

Caleb Dawson Gonzaga University Student Body President & Act Six Scholar

Dulce Gutierrez Vasquez – Diversity Outreach, Associated Students of Eastern Washington University

 

Sponsored by: Washington State Minority and Justice Commission, Eastern Washington University, NAACP Spokane Chapter, The Law Office of D.C. Cronin, Center for Justice