Individual World Poetry Slam African American Open Mic

4comculture.com

Here is a heads up for you to hear Mojdeh, an African American performance artist from Chicago.

Mojdeh will be performing at the 2017 Individual World Poetry Slam Thursday and Friday in competition bouts and will MC the African American Open Mic on Saturday. Mojdeh is the Director of the 2018 National Poetry Slam in Chicago; the Education Director of Poets With Class at the Poetry Center of Chicago; and a board member of Surviving The Mic.

website: mojdehstoakley.com

performance video: “An Open Letter To The Fair Jesus From A Dusk Toned Girl”

Competition Bout
Thursday Oct 12 6:30 pm
The Bartlett 228 W Sprague

Competition Bout
Friday Oct 13 6:30 pm
Boots Bakery 35 W Main Spokane

Individual World Poetry Slam African American Open Mic
Saturday Oct 14 10am – 12pm
Auntie’s Bookstore  402 W Main Spokane

Spokane poetry community hosts Individual World Poetry Slam for second time
“Between Spokane Poetry Slam, BootSlam, Three Minute Mic and Broken Mic, Spokane has made a name for itself in recent years as home to a thriving performance poetry community. After a successful event in 2013, Spokane is once again hosting the Individual World Poetry Slam, which will be in downtown Spokane from Wednesday through Oct. 14. . . . .
At the 2017 competition, 96 poets will perform during two nights of preliminary bouts at four venues – The Bartlett, Boots Bakery and Lounge, Rocket Bakery in the Holley Mason Building and the downtown branch of Spokane Public Library. ………
Host city coordinator Isaac Grambo, who also acts as commissioner of Spokane Poetry Slam, has spent the past two years preparing for this year’s event, which was created by Poetry Slam Inc.”    Spokesman Review Oct 06, 2017

 

How I See It : Waiting For Black People Is Like Waiting For Godot

Waiting for “My Spokane Black People” is like Waiting For GODot. Must we die first? Life After Trump. It has been difficult getting Spokane’s African American community involved in social justice concerns. Here’s something easy you can do. Come see talented young actress Regina Carerre at the September showing of Waiting for Godot.

The last time we, Bob and Diane Lloyd, were waiting for Godot was in the mid-1980’s at 123 Arts at 123 S. Madison with Dave Gustafson & his wife, Nancy Malloy, Johnnie Montgomery, Frank Ponikvar, Ralph Busch, Tim Behrens, Tom Davis, John Schneider, Jennifer LaRue, Brian Flick. 123 Arts was on the south side of the railroad tracks across from the Otis Hotel in another historic Spokane brick warehouse, now a parking lot for condos.

The Venue: Terrain

Don’t miss the mid-2010’s version 40 years later on the north side of the tracks at 304 W. Pacific. Watch for more Terrain events at the Washington Cracker building “changing our region one artist at a time”.

I witnessed a great performance by the Gonzaga University Dept. of Theater and Dance.

The Acting : The Cast

You should have seen Regina Carerre who played Pozzo. She is a senior at Gonzaga University with an English major and a double minor in Criminal Justice and Theatre. And Jaron Fuglie as the slave Lucky gave the most tremendous monologue when asked to demonstrate that he could think.

If you did not see it, it’s OK, Godot never showed. Come see it September 7 or 9 at 7:30 pm or September 10 at 2:00 pm.

The Set : The Art

The outdoor set IS the environment and changes with the forces upon it. The installation artist J. J. McCracken says that it “responds to adjacent elements: the constant flow of materials via the BNSF Railway and the history of the Washington Cracker building. Embedded objects refer to the transformation of raw material into goods through refinement and manufacture. Items in the junk pile suggest transportation, labor, communication, marketing, demand, consumption and waste when a hill of earth material slowly weathers, washing over and reclaiming them. The tree, questionably dead, loosely references beetle kill ravaging forests as climate change warms the North American woods. other referents include the Great pacific Garbage Patch.

The Trains

A moving part of the set, we wait for the next train. Part of the ambient sounds of police sirens, ambulances, motorcycles that weave into the stream of the sound design which featured selections from Insect Courage (2016) & Califone (1998) by Califone and Guitars Tuned to Air Conditioners (2016) by Tim Rutili & Craig Ross.

Says Director Charles M. Pepiton, “We are entangled. Climate changes. Leaves grow like ashes as the BNSF railway threads its way west and east rolling pipelines of oil, coal, and lumber. We wait. ‘But at this place, at this moment of time, all mankind is us, whether we like it or not.'”

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Spokane in Action: How Can I Get Involved?

Click here for Opportunities to organize, protest, make your voice heard

Hidden Figures: A Must See for Mothers and Daughters

5,000+ women marched in Spokane. How many will bring their children to see this story?

Scroll down to see other posts from 4comculture.com

 

How I Saw: Spokane’s 8,000 Women March by Robert Lloyd

Protester’s sign read stand up! speak up! and these protesters did it this cold Spokane winter day. Some who were lucky made it to inside halls standing and sitting in the warmth and could hear the messages from the Ballroom. Others filled sidewalks for blocks east and west and entertained each other with songs, music, chatter. The Davenport Hotel Coffee and Bar was a hit place to keep warm.

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After the March People Rose Up!

Marchers continued on to the Community Building where they shared chili, soup, music, poetry, speakers, a movie, action tables, creative activities for kids and adults, and began networking to take action.

Something You Can Do                                                    Personal Actions You Can Take

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Red Alert! Red Alert!

MLK Week Kicks Off

On January 14 in a small inland northwest town MLK Week kicked off with the Netflix documentary 13th:

Sandy Williams, publisher of the Black Lens News and Rev. Walter Kendricks president of the Spokane Ministers Fellowship started the week of Martin Luther King Jr. Celebrations with the screening of the Netflix documentary film 13th at Bethel AME Church in Spokane hosted by the Rev. Lonnie Mitchell.

Spokane Washington 2015 Census DataAfter the screening the audience – predominantly white residents of the inland northwest – broke up into small groups for discussion. How did they feel? What did they need to do about it?

  1. I wish all the kids in our school district could see this.
  2. I never heard of the organization ALEC.
  3. I have 4 family members with a total of over 100 years in prison plus one with 3 strikes you’re out.
  4. I think we need political action.
  5. I take Netflix and I have never seen this before.
  6. I worked on both sides of this issue – as a corrections officer on the inside and as a youth counselor on the outside.
  7. The corrections industry is a cesspool.
  8. We need to talk about self responsibility.
  9. Black people need to have serious discussions about race also.
  10. White people need to check out SURJ (Showing Up for Racial Justice). PJALS is starting a SURJ Spokane branch.
  11. Look into  Hope Cafe : Washington State Department of Corrections initiative.
  12. We can send out information to follow up on this meeting.
  13. Subscribe to Black Lens News.
  14. We can join forces with a group started on the west side of the state called Black Prisoners Caucus.
  15. There is a small group that meets the First Thursday of every month at the Rocket Market at 43rd & Scott at 10 am and discusses actions that may be taken to build the community we would like to live in.

As the meeting at Bethel AME was ending a workshop called

Love > Hate: Bystander Intervention Training

was being held by PJALS across town at the Spokane Public Library. This workshop gave hands on experience in how to challenge oppressive statements.

Peace and Justice Action League Joins Showing Up for Racial Justice

Spokane PJALS joins SURJ Show Up for Racial Justice

SURJ is a national network of groups and individuals organizing White people for racial justice. Through community organizing, mobilizing, and education, SURJ moves White people to act as part of a multi-racial majority for justice with passion and accountability. We work to connect people across the country while supporting and collaborating with local and national racial justice organizing efforts. SURJ provides a space to build relationships, skills and political analysis to act for change.

Our Vision for PJALS

The Peace and Justice Action League of Spokane engages everyday people to build a just and nonviolent world

Everyday people are together advancing peace, economic justice, and human rights, through campaigns grounded in the intersections of these values. We are:

  • Engaging youth, cultivating youth leadership and long-term involvement.
  • Nurturing strong relationships & active partnerships with communities of color, LGBT+ communities, faith communities, and other progressive bases.
  • Sharing our messages, setting the frame of debates, and engaging everyday people.
  • Delivering high-quality work through robust volunteer involvement and leadership, appropriate staffing, strong organizational systems, and a funding base that’s expanding, stable, and sufficient.

Presidential Campaign in Spokane

Train April 2016 4comculture

Attendees at Spokane Clinton & Sanders Campaign Speeches

Campaigning for the Presidency in Spokane March 2016 Bernie Sanders & Bill Clinton

Democratic Caucus Participants

Racism & Media Panel & Discussion

For analysis of these events see

Black Lens News April 2016 issue

Bridging the Generations: A Solution

There is a failure to communicate in African American institutions, churches, community and family. This has led to ineffectiveness in our social justice concerns as illustrated in the article Under One Roof, Divergent Views on ‘Black Lives Matter’.

Here is one solution to bridging the generations.

Level I: Icons: The 60 Plus Generation

The people in this generation are the ones who have shown community service and activism.  They represent tremendous amounts of wisdom, knowledge, experience and history that could be passed on to younger generations. There could be an annual forum where they can provide wisdom and moral support but not make policy.  A small group of 5 or so would mine the resources of their age group and recommend individuals to bring their wisdom, history and experience to the late career generation.

Level II: Late Career Generation

There is a late career generation (40 – 65) that has skills, resources, contacts and finances to contribute. They can consult with the Level I Icons and bring resources and raise funds for Levels III and IV but do not need to provide a lot of time nor make policy.

Level III: Early Career Generation

The early career folks (25 – 40) have challenges such as moving ahead in their jobs, raising children and navigating them through institutions such as school. They also have fairly recent education, housing, job hunting experiences and more. Having just gone through or presently going through these challenges should give them insights for developing policies. They can become advocates for children. They would train and check in on the young adults and respond to questions and concerns.

Level IV: The Dreamers

Young adults (18 – 30) are the dreamers. When Martin Luther King Jr spoke about having a dream this is who he was. They have ambition, time, energy, security, not as many responsibilities. They will survey the needs of adolescents and their communities.  They can develop programs and then carry out policies and programs. They can take risks, experiment with new challenges. They can relate to the struggles of young adolescents, mentor them, do peer counseling and provide role models for them.  They can work with younger children to meet their needs, develop services for themselves and younger folk,  at the same time gaining experience. This is CORE. This is SNCC. They are the SCLC field staff, the NAACP youth organization, the equivalent of the protesters of the 60’s. They are Black Lives Matter.

Level V: Our Future

Adolescents (12 – 18) are the target for programs carried out by The Dreamers. They need to be educated, made aware of future challenges and how they can be prepared for them. They can be guided toward broader opportunities, public service and the fun and satisfaction of working with others toward a common goal. Make up and size of target groups of adolescents need to be managed and controlled. Each group should be culturally, ethnically and economically mixed. Each group of 12 – 18 year olds should be small enough to comfortably meet in a home (10 – 12 people) so an institution is not needed to provide a meeting place. Perhaps meetings could rotate among the homes of the participants, thus maintaining communication with parents. 

A Change to Spokane NAACP

 

 

On December 23 the Spokane chapter of the NAACP held a strategy meeting where the president-elect Rachel Dolezal presented a PowerPoint of her suggested organizational structure and suggested officers for the new year. It was obvious looking at the room that there is new interest in the organization. See links to older 4comculture posts and pages regarding NAACP activity and compare them to posts of activity since Ferguson. I think this is the beginning of a new movement with a much younger and energetic group.  Only time will tell. I would encourage those under 40 to join the civic engagement and that we older folks stay home and send a check to support the youth.

Historical Note: When Dr. King joined the Montgomery Bus Boycott he was 26 years old. When he died he was 39 years old. Below are photographs of the SCLC field staff who were all in their late teens and early 20’s.

SIX STAFF HAIRBefore the dream -2We Were Young-2

Post Ferguson MO

Spokane solidarity with Ferguson MO

Gonzaga University Die In

Pre Ferguson MO

Spokane WA NAACP Freedom Banquet 2013

Spokane NAACP Photo Gallery