Textbooks for Ugandan Grade School Children

 

Angela Clinton

TEXTBOOKS for Ugandan Grade School Children

Organized by NAKISENYI FOUNDATION NURSERY AND PRIMARY SCHOOL

Greetings from Uganda!

My name is Angela Bukenya, a Clinton School of Public Service graduate student. I was born and raised in Uganda, but currently residing in the USA.

In addition to the skills i have gained as a student, i have been working to raise funds to assist the Nakisenyi Foundation Nursery and Boarding School in Uganda, based on a needs assessment, to help improve their education. Of immediate need for 254 students, is textbooks that they can use for the entire year that will cost less than $10 each.
I am therefore asking everyone with the same passion, to join me in accomplishing this goal through a donation of any amount.

If you can please be a part of my personal project, together we shall make a difference in the lives of these young ones.  Thank you in advance!

Textbooks for Ugandan Grade School

Reinvent Your Style with Afrique-Chic!

Photo

Tekay Designs

A new year starts a new season for spring styles. It’s time to clean house and prepare for a new you. Make a resolution to start by renovating your style with Afrique-Chic fashions.

The term Afrique-Chic defines the chic ethnic creations by today’s trend-setting Afro-centric Fashion Designers and beauty artists. The colorful patterns connect art and beauty with vitality and spirituality. Glam and glow …with flattering, floral and bright summer dresses. Colorful fashions are vital for perking up your confidence and self esteem. The Houston, Texas fashion house, TeKay Designs diligently creates Afrique-Chic fashions from a diversity of African cultures and traditions. TeKay creates custom and ready-made ethnic fashions for various occasions including casual, semi-formal, evening gowns, and party dresses to help you reinvent yourself and look good any time, anywhere.

This season, TeKay has launched a fashion show tour through out the “Lone Star State” to introduce Afrique-Chic dresses to the urban areas of Dallas, Austin, San Antonio and Houston Texas. “For this season” states TeKay Design’s Creative Director Kimma Wreh “…we’ve continued the ethnic line using multi colored fabrics, authentic Ankara fabrics, Hollandais fabrics, and Kikoy fabrics from Kenya. The collection includes sexy tops, jackets, pantsuits, short dresses with detachable trains and complimented with traditional head pieces and scarves.”

Many women aspire to own at least one beautifully executed Afrique-Chic garment because the dresses are endearing. The fabrics have meaning and cultural history. The universal law of attraction works with colored fabrics. The color you wear attracts the right type of energy and spiritual vibration. Style changes can help you to lift your spirits and be your best self. Let’s embrace the idea that women are dynamic and are constantly changing their looks. Like the seasons, the concept of change is good! The spirit of Afrique-Chic makes you feel better!

ABOUT TEKAY DESIGNS
TeKay Designs is a renowned online and mail order fashion house that offers custom designers and ready-to-wear ethnic and modern bridal, formal, casual maternity and jewelry. TeKay Designs features handcrafted pieces that appeal to those who appreciate elegance with a contemporary twist. TeKay Designs is most noted for providing unique ethnic wear and contemporary pieces for customers in the U.S.A and international customers. TeKay Designs has been featured in the following: New York Times, Get Married Magazine, Bridal Guide Magazine and African Vibes Magazine. The company facilitates production in Ghana, Africa and Houston, Texas.

The After Life Of An AAVoice Staff Member

Student Studies in Zambia:
Lorenzo, Master of Arts in Transformational Leadership (MATL)

Lorenzo Herman, S.J. is a current student in the Master of Arts program in Transformational Leadership (MATL). We met with Lorenzo recently to learn about his summer trip to Zambia as a part of his internship requirement in the MATL program.

When Lorenzo began the program Fall of 2011, he said that his interest immediately peaked when Dr. Sharon Henderson Callahan, Associate Dean for Academics & Student Life, mentioned in orientation that the internship requirement for the MATL could be fulfilled nationally or internationally through the School’s interdisciplinary options– including through Seattle University’s Nonprofit Leadership, Public Administration, Business and Law programs among others.

For eight weeks this past summer, Lorenzo lived in, explored and researched in Lusaka, the capital city of Zambia, while traveling to other cities within the country on assignment. Lorenzo was based within the Jesuit Centre for Theological Reflection in Lusaka, a centre highly respected throughout Africa for its focus on advocacy for social conditions, faith and justice, outreach and economic efforts. Centre founder, Peter Henriot, S.J., has taught on social analysis at Seattle University School of Theology and Ministry over the years, and his social analysis method is used in the Master of Arts programs in Transformational Leadership, Pastoral Studies, and Transforming Spirituality as well as the Master of Divinity program.

The Centre, along with 26 other organizations that make up the Civil Society Constitution Coalition, is working rigorously with the Zambian government on the first draft of their Constitution and meets weekly at the Centre. 

Prior to his visit, Lorenzo had studied the Constitution at length, and upon his arrival attended meetings with key political figures and stakeholders. In the Constitutional framework, one priority was to include clauses of non-discrimination, including for individuals that have disabilities. The Coalition was finding that the families of individuals with disabilities were directly and indirectly affected by the Constitution, and needed explicit clauses of inclusivity and equality that were monitored and enforced in the community. There were not any representatives from the special needs population or service organizations in the Coalition at that time and some research was needed to further their work on the Constitution.

Lorenzo set out to visit the Ng’ombe compound in Lusaka as a part of this research. Many children throughout Zambia struggle with autism, learning disabilities, cerebral palsy, and down syndrome, among other special needs. There is a special needs school within Ng’ombe called Little Assisi Day School, run by an Irish Franciscan sister, Sister Helen Scully, who also has a background in special needs education. The staff at the school do far more than teach–providing extensive support to mothers and special needs children in the community: from teaching, to healthcare, to home visits, to providing basic supplies for the families.

Lorenzo visited the School and spoke extensively with its staff–asking if he might be able to  interview the mothers of special needs children to find out more about their experiences of medical and social systems in Zambia to provide recommendations to the Centre and Coalition in their work on the country’s Constitution. Lorenzo then interviewed 18 mothers, with the support of two incredible teachers at Little Assisi: Edith and Paula. Each mother that Lorenzo interviewed worked intermittently while living in the community, had 0-6 years of education, had high hopes for their children, families and community, and all experienced some form of discrimination, shame and guilt from their communities because of their children’s struggle. Some reoccurring themes in their stories included housing needs, the lack of food and medical care, desire for self-empowerment and entrepreneurship, and hopes for employment and better transportation. It took two days for Lorenzo to type out 55 pages of notes from these interviews, which he then presented to colleagues from the Centre for evaluation. After evaluating themes as well as their subtexts/contexts that illuminate further their similarities and differences, Lorenzo drafted a succinct list of recommendations for the Centre and Coalition in their work.

This experience is close to both heart and home for Lorenzo, since his sister Leslie was born with hydrocephaly and cerebral palsy, and has experienced multiple surgeries and medical treatments over her 26 years. She currently participates in integrated educational programs and social programs in the community, while benefiting from disability benefits in the United States. Lorenzo shared throughout his interviews of special needs children’s mothers, he often thought of his own mother and her strength and struggle in supporting his dear sister.

Below are photographs from Lorenzo’s trip.

Lorenzo presented his qualitative research study entitled “The Mothers of Children With Learning Disabilities in Lusaka, Zambia” at the School on Thursday, November 29th, from 4:30-5:30pm. The study’s objective was to use the collected information and to make recommendations to the Jesuit Centre of Theological Reflection and to those local and national disability advocacy groups to facilitate making recommendations to reduce the burden of disability discrimination and stigma in Zambia. The focus of this research study was to learn how mothers who have children with a learning disability are affected by their families, faith communities, medical and social systems.

FRESH OFF THE PRESS!
Since we interviewed Lorenzo, he has been elected as President of the National Black Catholic Seminarians Association (NBCSA), which seeks to contribute to the wellbeing of candidates for priesthood and religious life, with an emphasis on Black American, African, Afro-Caribbean, and Afro-Latino candidates preparing to serve the Church in the United States and its territories. The Association is an affiliate of the National Black Catholic Clergy Caucus. The National Black Catholic Seminarians Association also cooperates with the National Black Sisters Conference.

Lorenzo_Zambia1.jpg

From the Soweto Market (above and below)
Lorenzo_Zambia2.jpg

 

Lorenzo_Zambia3.jpg

Lorenzo comments on the above photo:
“I was walking home one day when I came upon these two boys in front of me. It was endearing to see the public affection they have for each other. They were inseparable and having a great time. I could not understand what they were saying because they were speaking Nyanja but their body language was endearing, playful, and sincere.”

Lorenzo_Zambia4.jpg

Lorenzo shares about this photo, above:
“I thanked the wonderful lady next to me who let me help sell her fish for a while. She thought I was weird for asking. — at Soweto Market.”

 

 

 

A Mother’s Love: Nothing Is Greater

 

Delali Dogbe

For some today is Mothers Day. For some today is graduation. For Delali Dogbe it is Mothers Day. For her son Kelvin Garner it is his graduation from Whitworth College. They celebrated this day together at the North Central Care Center.

Do you remember the Whitworth freshman from Ghana whose story appeared in the March 1, 2011 issue of the Whitworthian? Since June 6, 2009 Kelvin has been semi-comatose. His mother, who left Ghana immediately when she heard of his accident, has been by his side for nearly three years.

We will be continuing Kelvin’s story later this week. Watch for future posts.

Receiving Honorary Alumnus Certificate

Archbishop Desmond Tutu: Gonzaga University graduates deserve the honor of hearing him.

Archbishop Desmond Tutu with Nelson Mandela. Both men were awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

A powerful network of right-wing Catholics is trying to ban Archbishop Desmond Tutu from speaking at Gonzaga University next month.

Archbishop Tutu, who won the Nobel Peace Prize for his courageous opposition to South African apartheid, is beloved around the world as a powerful voice for peace and justice. But that doesn’t matter to the extremists who’ve been waging a McCarthyist campaign of fear and intimidation on Catholic college campuses across the country.

The Cardinal Newman Society, which led the opposition to President Obama’s commencement speech at Notre Dame three years ago, is circulating a petition demanding that the President of Gonzaga University disinvite Archbishop Tutu—but so far this time they only have a few hundred signatures. Let’s make sure Gonzaga doesn’t give in to the Religious Right!

That’s why I created a petition to Thayne McCulloh, President, Gonzaga Univeresity on SignOn.org, which says:

Archbishop Desmond Tutu is a powerful voice for peace and justice, and Gonzaga University graduates deserve the honor of hearing him speak at commencement this year. Don’t give in to the Religious Right extremists who are trying to silence him.

Will you sign the petition? Click here to add your name, and then pass it along to your friends:

http://www.moveon.org/r?r=274584&id=39706-8463490-3keIT6x&t=2 <http://www.moveon.org/r?r=274584&amp;id=39706-8463490-3keIT6x&amp;t=2>

Thanks!

–Michael Sherrard, Faithful America

The text above was written by Michael Sherrard, not by MoveOn staff, and MoveOn is not responsible for the content.

Desmond Tutu By Invitation Only

https://i1.wp.com/news.gonzaga.edu/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/Desmond_Tutu_sitting_cropped_img17992.jpg?w=584

SPOKANE, Wash. – Gonzaga University seniors will have the rare honor of hearing from Nobel Laureate Desmond M. Tutu, Archbishop Emeritus of Cape Town, South Africa, as their keynote speaker at Senior Commencement May 13. Archbishop Tutu, an inspirational voice for justice, peace, truth and reconciliation throughout his ministry, retired from public life in 2010 but enthusiastically accepted Gonzaga’s invitation after being inspired by the global activism of Gonzaga’s students, faculty and alumni. Read more……

 

Will there be an opportunity to hear Desmond Tutu while he is in Spokane? If you know, please post.

Gospel Explosion: Black History Month Celebration

February 10 7 pm Seeley G. Mudd Chapel: Join Whitworth students and Spokane-area choirs for this annual celebration of Black History Month. Contact Stephy Nobles-Beans 509.777.4568 or sbeans@whitworth.edu

March 8 7:30 pm Robinson Teaching Theater, Weyerhauser Hall: Great Decisions Lecture: Megan Hershey “Democratic Challenges and Change in Contemporary Africa”. Hershey won the Carlton T. Hodge Prize in African Studies and Fulbright Hays Research Abroad Grant for her work with NGOs addressing HIV/AIDS in Kenya.

We All Have a Story

From Angela B:

Loved the calendar story today and I found a lot of similarity with self. I am supporting the Giants for once because a Ugandan is playing in the team.

Kiwanuka Goes Home, but His Heart Is Far Away

 

By SAM BORDEN

Published: January 30, 2012 New York Times

EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. – Mathias Kiwanuka says he does not remember how old he was when he first found out his grandfather had been assassinated. He struggles to remember the point at which he realized the true meaning of his own last name. He is not certain when he became aware of his family’s importance in African history.

But that is not important, Kiwanuka said recently, because he knows now. He read about his grandfather Benedicto Kiwanuka’s becoming the first prime minister of Uganda and heard about the plight forced upon a man trying to mold freedom out of a society stiffened by chaos. He learned about the pain and suffering Benedicto saw and felt.

And so he knows, too, about Benedicto’s being killed by the despot Idi Amin, a death foretold by some, dreaded by many and seen by experts as a development that set back progress in East Africa for years.

This week, as the Giants prepare to face the New England Patriots in the Super Bowl, Mathias Kiwanuka will be the subject of countless articles and interviews. The reason is obvious: This is his return home. Kiwanuka, now a linebacker for the Giants, was born in Indianapolis. He went to Cathedral High School, a little more than 10 miles from Lucas Oil Stadium, where the Super Bowl will be played Sunday. He won two state championships.

Everyone will want to tell his story, whether it is about his old high school days or how he ended up at Boston College. Old friends will gather around, too, wanting to know about how this season went or how Kiwanuka’s brother, Ben, is doing a year and a half after a horrific motorcycle accident that Kiwanuka witnessed from his own bike just feet away. (Ben is doing well, Kiwanuka said.) Some may even want to talk fatherhood – after all, Kiwanuka and his fiancée are expecting a daughter in March.

See the full story

We all have a story to tell. We would love to publish yours here. Send it to us at info@4comculture.com

Need help getting started telling your story? The Cummunity Colleges Institute for Extended Learning has a class you can take starting tomorrow:

Writing Your Life Story

We all have a story to tell. Let’s remember, write it, and possibly pass it along. Exercises each day with prompts, reading and free writes help you write your story. class includes a bibliography of memoirs and hits on how to write a memoir.

Item: M370 Dian Zahner

1:30 pm – 3:30 pm 5 Thursdays 2/2/2012 – 3/1/2012 $36

Location:   CenterPlace, Rm: 205 2426 N Discovery Place, Spokane Valley

Contact (509) 279-6030 or 1 – (800) 845-3324