Bob’s Tuesday Black American Portrait

The Los Angeles County Museum of Art published a new book: Black American Portraits. I seem to have missed the publication deadline as none of my portraits appear to be in the book.

So to keep you up to date I will be publishing an African American portrait every Tuesday. See you on Tuesdays!

Jeffrey Carrol 2019 By Robert J Lloyd

First Thursday Social Justice Coffee Discussion Group Member

Firefari Carrol Oct 26, 2021: Today we lost a legend. A man we will remember always. My father, Jeffrey Carrol left us to hang with Bob in the great after. I only have one request – can we all play Bob Marley today and fill the world with songs of freedom. Hope dad and mom are smoking the biggest splif ever. – Facebook post

Art and Music After 80 Part 2

Homage to the Past, Hope & Inspiration for the Future

Black Women are inspiring their peers and other generations to break the stereotypes that are often associated with aging. The idea for this work comes from a Chicago Black women’s band The KCR Ensemble, led by 75 year old guitarist Rita Hassell and managed by her husband Oliver Hassell.

Here they are:
https://www.youtube.com/results? search_query=youtu.be%2FX3KYqgv2vWY

The art is not portraits of the KCR Ensemble members, but follows the pattern of and pays homage to these women who are playing the classics, the music from the diaspora, contemporary and futuristic jazz.

The images pay homage to art that has gone before, art media, and cutting edge art of today.

Now the work is available in our concert halls and internet venues.

Art and Music Swinging After 80

Homage to the Past, Hope & Inspiration for the Future

Black Women are inspiring their peers and other generations to break the stereotypes that are often associated with aging. The idea for this work comes from a Chicago Black women’s band The KCR Ensemble, led by 75 year old guitarist Rita Hassell and managed by her husband Oliver Hassell. Here they are:
https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=youtu.be%2FX3KYqgv2vWY

The art is not portraits of the KCR Ensemble members, but follows the pattern of and pays homage to these women who are playing the classics, the music from the diaspora, contemporary and futuristic jazz.

The images pay homage to art that has gone before, art media, and cutting edge art of today.

Art and Music Swinging After 80: Mixed Media by Robert Lloyd

Homage to the Past, Hope & Inspiration for the Future

Black Women are inspiring their peers and other generations to break the stereotypes that are often associated with aging. The idea for this work comes from a Chicago Black women’s band The KCR Ensemble, led by 75 year old guitarist Rita Hassell and managed by her husband Oliver Hassell. Here they are:
https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=youtu.be%2FX3KYqgv2vWY The art is not portraits of the KCR Ensemble members, but follows the pattern of and pays homage to these women who are playing the classics, the music from the diaspora, contemporary and futuristic jazz. The images pay homage to art that has gone before, art media, and cutting edge art of today.

OUR STORIES OUR VISIONS

Carl Maxey Center

OUR STORIES OUR VISIONS ARTISTS

OUR STORIES OUR VISIONS

Whitney Evans

Whitney Evans graduated with a BFA in Ceramics from Eastern Washington University in 2018 and currently resides in Spokane, WA. She is a multi-disciplinary artist that continues an evolving development of her “Toast” themes, autobiographical, and surrealistic narratives that she applies to functional and fine art ceramics, sculpture, mixed media and digital works. She attempts to engage viewers with content that’s directly subject to personal thoughts, hidden interpretations, with pop art and minimalist influences.

Website: weceramics.bigcartel.com
Instagram: whitneye.ceramics.and.stuff

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Sarah Torres

Biography

Sarah Torres is a multi-disciplinary artist based in both Spokane and Seattle, WA, working in painting, video, photography, and digital art. Sarah holds an Associate’s of Fine Arts degree from Spokane Falls Community College and is currently pursuing a Bachelor of Fine Arts at the University of Washington. Sarah’s work has been included in numerous group exhibitions including “Express Yourself” and “Power to the People – Stick it to the Wall,” at the Terrain gallery (Spokane, WA) and the Apostrophe 2021 Exhibition at Bridgepress Cellars (Spokane, WA). Public works include projection and net-based work for the Black Lens’ Creating Health Initiative and numerous collaborative murals around the city of Spokane, including the BLACK LIVES MATTER mural commissioned by Seven2 + 14Four. Sarah’s illustrations have been published on the cover of The Inlander, an Inland Northwest newspaper based in Spokane, WA.

Artist Statement

Exploring the implications of living in a highly digital world, I am investigating the intersections of video, digital photography, painting, and printmaking. I regularly question how materials can be transformed through an extended process, both digitally and physically. Highly inspired by texture and pattern, both naturally occurring and artificially created, I create high contrast motifs that reflect this interest. The source material is typically taken from nature and abstracted to create familiar but non-representational patterning. Interrogating the relationships between human and non-human life is the content of much of my work. There, in the content of my work, can also be found an interest in the function and purpose of language as well as how language can be manipulated and subverted. I explore the meanings and context of visual, verbal, and digital/computer language as well as how they can be used in art to engage different audiences.

Transcription #1 Oil on Canvas 13×13
Transcript #2 (Erasure of Memory) Oil on Canvas 24×25

These paintings are from a new series of work titled Transcriptions of Memory. This body of work explores the mutability of memory, both mental and digital. Do people of the digital age depend more on their devices versus their minds to store their memories? Are our photos, notes, contacts, and even language more or less secure when stored on a piece of hardware? Is there just as much room for manipulation and transformation of our memories when they are digitally stored? The paintings titled Transcription 1 and Transcription 2 are representations of a single video still, or a memory. They were painted in differing manners to emphasize the tendency of experiences to be recalled from memory differently, depending on circumstance. This visually exemplifies the potential for memories or past experiences to live in the body, or device, as an essence or representation of the truth; always subject to change. As some formal elements of the video still were transcribed by hand with paint, some visual information has been selectively omitted.

https://www.instagram.com/art.storres/

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OUR STORIES OUR VISIONS

Sironka

I am Nicholas Sironka, (I go by Sironka) a Maasai batik artist, with a God given talent. I was born and raised in Kenya, a country in East Africa. We have 42 different tribes in Kenya. Each tribe speaks a distinctively different language from the other. There is however a national language that helps all these tribes communicate with each other – Kiswahili. (Remember ‘Hakuna matte” in the movie Lion King?). I am Maasai, a small pastoralist tribe living mostly in the southern plains of Kenya known as the Rift Valley.

In the year 2000, I was awarded the prestigious Fulbright Scholar-In-Residence Award from the U. S. Government to com teach batik art and Maasai culture at Whitworth University in Spokane Washington.

Ever since childhood I was always fascinated by my Maasai culture, a culture that was very much misinterpreted and misunderstood. It is then that I made it my life’s ambition to find a way to tell the truth about my people and to do so with dignity and truth. With my God given talent I determined that batik was the medium I would use to make good of this quest.

Today I sell my original art and enjoy teaching batik art classes and also continue to hold lectures on the Maasai culture whenever I am invited to do so.

My passion to speak on the facets of my culture portrayed in my pieces has many times been impactful emotionally for those buying my art or simply coming and listening to my explanations of deeper meaning for the paintings. Many asked if I was a counselor, and after much thought, I decided to go to school. I am happy to say that today I hold a degree as a certified substance abuse counselor!

You can also see more on my work at https://youtu.be/aC0mhiCCZ18
In 2016 I published a book “Feed me with words – A journey through Maasai culture in batik art” https://youtu.be/qs9IhkUirRk 

My philosophy: “If I can use my talents to touch another life, and make it better, then I will be fulfilling the purpose for which God put me on this Earth!”

https://www.madcolabstudios.com/sironka-batik-artist

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OUR STORIES OUR VISIONS

Afaria Duke

man mythical poet, hue man 

Artist Statement

I want to express my feelings rather than illustrate them.

I channel my medium for creation through various tools such as, paint brushes, thread, metal, wood, earth, and copper.

My motto “my art 🖼 does not fit into one box 📦”

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