How I See It : Mask Making

Make masks for Blue voters / Let Red go to church / Blue pray at home

Sometimes we can’t wait on the cavalry!
Let’s put the wagons in a circle.
The battle has begun!
We are under attack, we must do the best we can with what we have.
The creative will have the best chance for survival.
It’s good to be prepared and independent but in times like this we need to be inter-dependent.

Help Name a New School After Frances Scott

Spokane Public School District 81 is looking for nominations for names of new schools and buildings. We nominated Frances Scott for the new middle school in NE Spokane on Foothills Drive. We also nominated Ruben Trejo (see the link) for the new building for the On Track Academy located on the Shaw Campus.

Frances Scott 1921 – 2010

Scott was one of Spokane’s remarkable people – the city’s first African-American woman attorney, a teacher at Rogers High School for more than 30 years, a president of the Spokane Education Association and a president of the Washington State University Board of Regents.

She was also a forceful and stalwart leader in the local civil rights movement, which helped drag a recalcitrant Spokane toward equality. She believed in nonviolence, but don’t confuse that with meekness.

Listen to Scott in a 1982 talk: “We must exercise some degree of militancy … against slumlords, against Klansmen, against people who want no minorities in their neighborhoods, against racist textbooks and against politicians who thrive on bigotry. Otherwise, people will say in the future, ‘You were there. What did you do about it?’ ”

She grew up during the 1920s and 1930s, especially tough times for a black person aspiring to be a professional in Spokane.

When Scott was a student at Marycliff High School in the late 1930s, she and some of her high school friends went to the Davenport Hotel to interview the famous opera star Marian Anderson for the school paper.

The Davenport made Scott ride in the freight elevator.

“My white friends – bless their hearts – decided if I had to ride the freight elevator, they would, too,” she later said.

They couldn’t find Anderson’s room – for good reason. Anderson was black and the Davenport was lily-white in those days. The girls eventually found Anderson in a small hotel nearby.

Scott spoke often of the time when, as a girl, she had to have her appendix removed at a Spokane hospital. The hospital gave her a private room – but only so a white patient wouldn’t have to share.

“I suppose that was one of the advantages of being black,” she said, dryly. “But it was humiliating when you realize why I got the room to myself.”

She graduated from Marycliff and went on to Holy Names College. She married W. Vernon Scott, a Spokane chiropractor, while still in college – and that didn’t go over well with the nuns at Holy Names.

“The good nuns put her out because she married a divorced man in her senior year,” said her sister, Ruth Nichols, of Spokane.

Undeterred, Scott finished her degree at Whitworth College (now University) and then went on to get a master’s degree in education. This was 1958 – a time when the Spokane School District had only four black teachers, up from zero in 1950.

She was hired at Rogers because “my credentials were good enough for them to hire me without doing me a favor.” She would teach English and German there for more than three decades.

She was 54 when she decided to take on another academic challenge.

“She wanted her son to go to law school,” Nichols said. “And we all said, if you want a lawyer in the family, you should go yourself.”

So she did. She graduated from the Gonzaga University School of Law in 1979 – and became Spokane’s first African-American woman attorney. When she was sworn in to the bar, she said, “I want to be able to instruct, as well as represent, minority people in their dealings with the law.”

She went on to practice law on the side, taking mostly civil rights and pro bono cases, while still keeping her Rogers teaching job.

Scott soon found her law degree handy in an entirely new arena. In 1981 she was elected president of the teachers union, the Spokane Education Association. Her election was notable for at least one reason: She had been one of the few teachers to cross picket lines in a 1979 strike. She was able to convince her fellow teachers that she had been bound, as an attorney, to obey a court injunction that had ordered teachers back to work. She remained president of the union until 1983.

She was also deeply involved in the Spokane branch of the NAACP, in the Democratic Party and at Holy Trinity Episcopal Church.

Excerpted from Distinguished Woman Left Us a Legacy by Jim Kershner.

The Spokesman Review Sat. Oct. 23 2010

Yes! We’re All In This Together

Indigenous People’s March Spokane 2019

Women’s March Spokane 2019

Martin Luther King Jr Day March 2019

Conscious / Cohesive / Connectivity

ORIGAMI

As with the ancient art of paper folding/shaping, we’re all in this together. 4comculture.com is a focused effort to guide and shape the good energies and efforts of various groups in Spokane into something singular, something beautiful, something wonderfully effective. With your permission and your help our goal is to be a one stop, centralized, trusted connection point for what’s happened, what’s happening and what we can do together to affect what happens in the future of our community. In this age of Facebook, Instagram, the Internet and Inboxes, there’s no excuse for “I didn’t know, I wasn’t aware, and I would’ve helped.”

Make a huge statement by clicking Contact Us in the menu under the banner above and typing “Yes I care” in the Subject line of the Contact Us box that appears, also sharing your name and email address. Part of our mandate, that we take very seriously, is to never abuse your trust, share your information or misuse your very very valuable time.

Consensus On Values

Gallery

This gallery contains 1 photo.

  “This” is our Values: Can We Get Consensus On This? We believe in justice for all * We believe in lifting up the disadvantaged * We believe in dismantling unjust criminalization systems * We believe in equal protection under … Continue reading

Speak Up For The Least Of Us

They rally, they’re marching, they’re resisting. Join them NOW! Trump may come for you tomorrow. Come have coffee with us and discuss future programs of action to build a community we want to live in. 10 am the First Thursday of each month at the East Central Community Center  500 S. Stone Street.

ROBERT LLOYD Exhibition East Central Community Ctr.

In This exhibit was first seen at the Spokane downtown library from January through March. Now we will be moving two E. Central Community Center we were able find it’s permanent home. But it will be made available to other institutions and galleries if you’re interested contact Robert Lloyd at rdlloyd@comcast.net.

Coming soon to East Central Community Ctr. 500 S. Stone.

If You Really Knew Me you’d know that I’m the Black guy photographing your events and meetings.  If You Really Knew Me you’d know I am a supporter of community building (4comculture.com).  If You Really Knew Me you’d know I taught my photography students that good photographs have four components.

This exhibition has

  • Impact – size 4 x 5 feet
  • Technique – cutting edge technology: CherryPIX video
  • Design/Composition – bold colors, striking brush strokes and textures, interaction
  • Content – in depth storytelling, stereotype blowing, media mixing, community building

If you would like to take part and meet new friends, you’ll visit East Central Community Ctr. 500 S. Stone Spokane WA for First Thur each month at10 AM coffee discussion.

IF YOU REALLY KNEW ME Stories of Survivors and Warriors.

EXHIBITION

This exhibit we’ll be House & display at the E. Central Community Ctr.  May.

 

This will be a traveling exhibit and can be made available for exhibitions at your gallery or institution. contact Robert Lloyd at rdlloyd@comcast.net

Photographs by Robert Lloyd

Video by Doug Dalton and DaShawn Bedford

Wendy Levy for The Alliance for Media Arts + Culture

A collaborative, interactive photography exhibition in honor of Human Trafficking Awareness month in Spokane, these photographs were created with local women survivors and warriors. We hope these images and stories raise awareness, engagement and political will, so all those still in risk may find safety and freedom.

A project of The Alliance for Media Arts + Culture, The Spokane Human Rights Commission, Community-Minded Television,The Jonah Project and Spokane Arts Supply

Join The Poor People’s Campaign

What Can We Do Spokane?  How about inviting  5-6 people for coffee, tea or milk and have a DISCUSSION about how you can help The Poor People’s Campaign locally. After your meeting visit https://wp.me/P1UPVH-2Xj and use the Leave a Comment box to tell us about what you decided.  Below is more information about the campaign. The national website is www.poorpeoplescampaign.org

What White Women Can Do!

Who Does Safety Pin Box Support?

Safety Pin Box benefits all people involved, but is specifically geared at supporting Black women & femmes who are contributing to the movement for Black lives.

Every month, Safety Pin Box will give one-time financial gifts to individual Black women who have demonstrated a commitment to serving Black people. Financial gift recipients will be featured in that month’s box at their discretion, and will be invited to contribute to that month’s task writing. Any and all Black women contributing to Black liberation in any way are encouraged to apply and recipients will be chosen at random each month from Black women applicants in our pool. The more subscribers we have, the more Black women we can support. Subscription fees, as a form of reparations, go directly to supporting Black women freedom fighters every month.

Learn More Click  https://www.safetypinbox.com/black-women-being/

 

 

Individual World Poetry Slam African American Open Mic

4comculture.com

Here is a heads up for you to hear Mojdeh, an African American performance artist from Chicago.

Mojdeh will be performing at the 2017 Individual World Poetry Slam Thursday and Friday in competition bouts and will MC the African American Open Mic on Saturday. Mojdeh is the Director of the 2018 National Poetry Slam in Chicago; the Education Director of Poets With Class at the Poetry Center of Chicago; and a board member of Surviving The Mic.

website: mojdehstoakley.com

performance video: “An Open Letter To The Fair Jesus From A Dusk Toned Girl”

Competition Bout
Thursday Oct 12 6:30 pm
The Bartlett 228 W Sprague

Competition Bout
Friday Oct 13 6:30 pm
Boots Bakery 35 W Main Spokane

Individual World Poetry Slam African American Open Mic
Saturday Oct 14 10am – 12pm
Auntie’s Bookstore  402 W Main Spokane

Spokane poetry community hosts Individual World Poetry Slam for second time
“Between Spokane Poetry Slam, BootSlam, Three Minute Mic and Broken Mic, Spokane has made a name for itself in recent years as home to a thriving performance poetry community. After a successful event in 2013, Spokane is once again hosting the Individual World Poetry Slam, which will be in downtown Spokane from Wednesday through Oct. 14. . . . .
At the 2017 competition, 96 poets will perform during two nights of preliminary bouts at four venues – The Bartlett, Boots Bakery and Lounge, Rocket Bakery in the Holley Mason Building and the downtown branch of Spokane Public Library. ………
Host city coordinator Isaac Grambo, who also acts as commissioner of Spokane Poetry Slam, has spent the past two years preparing for this year’s event, which was created by Poetry Slam Inc.”    Spokesman Review Oct 06, 2017