Spokane in Action: How Can I Get Involved?

Click here for Opportunities to organize, protest, make your voice heard

New First Thursday Coffee and Discussion Group

There are now three First Thursday Coffee and Discussion groups meeting this Thursday March 1. 

  • Original Group 10:00 am Rocket Market 726 E 43rd 
  • First Thursday Evening at 6:30 pm Rocket Market 726 E 43rd
  • Perry Street discussion usually held at The Shop at 10:00 am but this week being held at the organizer’s home so they can write letters to legislators as well as share resources and updates on what is happening. If you are interested in this group message Susan Hales on Facebook.

Possible discussion topics:

  • President Trump’s State of the Union speech
  • Youth Incarceration
  • 13th The Movie
  • Black Lunch Table
  • Oscars: Moonlight/Hidden Figures/Fences
  • Local Actions
  • …….And anything else you have on your mind

First Thursday Coffee and Discussion March 2, 2017

There are now two First Thursday Coffee and Discussion groups: 

  • Original Group 10:00 am Rocket Market 726 E 43rd 
  • First Thursday at 6:30 pm Rocket Market 726 E 43rd
  • Third discussion group to be announced

Possible discussion topics:

  • Youth Incarceration
  • 13th The Movie
  • Black Lunch Table
  • Oscars: Moonlight/Hidden Figures/Fences
  • Local Actions
  • …….And anything else you have on your mind

PJALS on the Forefront

Join PJALS!  Sign up for notifications of what’s going on in Spokane and the world.

Our 8th Annual Peace & Justice Action Conference will be held February 24-25th at the Unitarian Universalist Church of Spokane.Friday,

Feb. 24 6-9pm Rise Up! Opening Reception

Saturday, Feb. 25 9am-5pm All Day Action Conference               Register Now!

Rave reviews about our Action Conference:

 “Great variety of programs and the opportunity to meet new people!”

“It gave me inspiration and hope.”

“Surrounded by the energy of like minded people, rare in Spokane!”

“Open discussions, amazing positive energy, and equality.” Read more »

Location: Unitarian Universalist Church of Spokane, 4340 W. Ft. Wright Drive

Friday, February 24th: Opening Reception

6:00-9:00 Join us for tasty nosh, wine & more, and performances from local musical & spoken word artists:

Saturday, February 25th: Conference 

Join us for a full day with three workshop sessions, a fantastic keynote, breakfast, lunch, and lots of opportunities to connect with like-minded folks who are putting their values into action!

8:00-9:00 Registration and Networking Breakfast

8:45-9:00 Opening Performances

9:00-9:30 Welcome and Dedication

9:30-9:45 Mixer Break

9:45-11:15 “Education for Action” Workshop Session 1 (90 min)

Mobilizing for Justice and Community: How-To’s for Powerful Actions and Campaigns Liz Moore, Peace & Justice Action League of Spokane

Challenging Oppressive Statements Shar Lichty, Peace & Justice Action League of Spokane

No Discrimination Spokane: Defeating Spokane’s Anti-Immigrant Proposition
Erin Williams Heuter, Lutheran Community Services NW, Breean Beggs, City Council member, and John Lemus, City of Spokane Human Rights Commission

Developing Skill in Compassionate Communication: Alternatives to Judging,Shaming, and Blaming Mark Hamlin, Carol Bryan, & Susan Burns – Nonviolent Communication Facilitators

Impacts of Military Occupation on our Communities
Hollis Higgins, Ray Thorne, Mike Edwards, Larry Shook, Mary Kay McCollum, & George Taylor,  Veterans for Peace, Spokane Chapter #35

Friar Tuck Faith
Liv Larson Andrews, Pastor, Salem Lutheran Church

Wake Up and Work: Anti-Racism for White People
Taylor Weech, PJALS Steering Committee

11:15-11:30Mixer Break

2:45-4:15 “Education for Action” Workshop Session 3 (90 min)

Building a Unified Movement: Power, Identity, & Solidarity Stina Janssen, Board member, Tenants Union of Washington, and Ingrid Chapman, United Auto Workers

Bystander Intervention Tara Dowd,  Red Fox Consulting

A Lesson on Privilege for Progressives: Why are People of Color So Angry?
Sandy Williams, Black Lens News

How to Advocate for Justice in the State Legislature Liezl Rebugio, ACLU-WA

More than Just Malice: the Most Dangerous Law in America Gabe Meyer & Reynelle Warren, Not this Time

4:15-5:00 Closing Plenary: Going Forward Together!

Dr. Joy DeGruy Speaks at EWU

On February 16, 2016 internationally renowned educator and researcher Joy DeGruy, PhD, held a special workshop at Eastern Washington University on topics of cultural sensitivity and diversity, as well as areas of mental and ecological resilience. DeGruy’s four-hour presentation, Culture-Specific Models of Service, Delivery and Practice, was sponsored by EWU’s Black Student Union (BSU) and co-sponsored by EWU’s Africana Education Program, the Office of the President and Housing and Residential Life.

In addition to her pioneering work in the explanatory theory and book, Post Traumatic Slave Syndrome, DeGruy has developed a culturally based education model for working with children and adults of color.

For the complete article click on the link below:

Dealing with Cognitive Dissonance: The Statue of Liberty

 

Local Direct Action

What’s your burning issue?  What are you doing about it? There are lots of opportunities locally and nationally to make your voice heard and be part of making positive change. Scroll down to check out some options.

Spokane Indivisible                                    Together for Washington 

PJALS Peace & Justice Action Leaque      First Thursday Discussion

SURJ Showing Up for Racial Justice          Black Lens News

NAACP Spokane                                        NAACP National

Advice for Advocates

 Photo by Bob Lloyd from People Rise Up! PJALS

Note from Bob Lloyd: This article was originally published by the Inlander January 26, 2017. Follow the link below to see the original post. Advice for Advocates is a regular feature  by Mariah McKay.

Tips for people looking to be the change in these unprecedented times

A roar breaks out as the throng takes its first steps onto the icy streets of Spokane. While no laws or elected positions changed after last weekend’s Women’s March, an era of anemic insider-driven politics officially came to an end. If you are one of the many who feel called to take back our democracy, here are six helpful hints to heed along your journey:

FIND YOUR PLACE

You know those universe maps with a tiny arrow pointing to a dot that says “You are here?” That is you in this new mass movement. Learn about the constellations of groups already working on your issues, rather than reinventing the wheel. Don’t know where to start? Try Google or the “three degrees” approach. Ask someone who knows someone who does. Think about your unique abilities and focus on a role that plays to your strengths.

EMBRACE COMPLEXITY

It is possible for two or more things to be true at once. We are so conditioned to think in “either/or” terms, we often miss out on opportunities in between. Just because your neighbor disagrees with you on one issue doesn’t mean they won’t help you on another. Remember to not see people, organizations or institutions as monolithic.

JOY LOVES COMPANY

Some think you aren’t doing enough unless you are exhausted and miserable. This culture of stress is counter-strategic. The change we seek is a marathon and not a sprint; thus, you must sustain yourself for the long haul. Balance organizing hard with celebration and rest. People are attracted to a movement that is fun and joyous!

THINK AND ACT LOCALLY

The specter of national politics has sucked many into a cycle of emotional reactivity. Turn your existential angst into real-world action in your own backyard. Resources for engaging your congressperson, like the Indivisible Guide (indivisibleguide.com), are also relevant at the city, county and state levels. If just a fraction of the energy displayed at the Women’s March were channeled into local arenas, mountains would be on the move.

PUT PEOPLE FIRST

Revolution is the business of radical relationships. Befriend those who are different from you and find ways to celebrate your common humanity. Abandon name-calling and clever insults. Be as specific and respectful with your concerns as you can be. When reaching across a political divide, don’t immediately dive into issues. Be a person first, and you may be surprised by the friendship that will follow.

In the end, all these tips are about getting outside yourself. Ego is the ultimate enemy of an effective mass movement. Enjoy the liberation that comes with knowing you are not the only one!

Mariah McKay is a fourth-generation daughter of Spokane and a community organizer campaigning for racial, social and economic justice. She currently serves as a public health advocate.