PJALS on the Forefront

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Our 8th Annual Peace & Justice Action Conference will be held February 24-25th at the Unitarian Universalist Church of Spokane.Friday,

Feb. 24 6-9pm Rise Up! Opening Reception

Saturday, Feb. 25 9am-5pm All Day Action Conference               Register Now!

Rave reviews about our Action Conference:

 “Great variety of programs and the opportunity to meet new people!”

“It gave me inspiration and hope.”

“Surrounded by the energy of like minded people, rare in Spokane!”

“Open discussions, amazing positive energy, and equality.” Read more »

Location: Unitarian Universalist Church of Spokane, 4340 W. Ft. Wright Drive

Friday, February 24th: Opening Reception

6:00-9:00 Join us for tasty nosh, wine & more, and performances from local musical & spoken word artists:

Saturday, February 25th: Conference 

Join us for a full day with three workshop sessions, a fantastic keynote, breakfast, lunch, and lots of opportunities to connect with like-minded folks who are putting their values into action!

8:00-9:00 Registration and Networking Breakfast

8:45-9:00 Opening Performances

9:00-9:30 Welcome and Dedication

9:30-9:45 Mixer Break

9:45-11:15 “Education for Action” Workshop Session 1 (90 min)

Mobilizing for Justice and Community: How-To’s for Powerful Actions and Campaigns Liz Moore, Peace & Justice Action League of Spokane

Challenging Oppressive Statements Shar Lichty, Peace & Justice Action League of Spokane

No Discrimination Spokane: Defeating Spokane’s Anti-Immigrant Proposition
Erin Williams Heuter, Lutheran Community Services NW, Breean Beggs, City Council member, and John Lemus, City of Spokane Human Rights Commission

Developing Skill in Compassionate Communication: Alternatives to Judging,Shaming, and Blaming Mark Hamlin, Carol Bryan, & Susan Burns – Nonviolent Communication Facilitators

Impacts of Military Occupation on our Communities
Hollis Higgins, Ray Thorne, Mike Edwards, Larry Shook, Mary Kay McCollum, & George Taylor,  Veterans for Peace, Spokane Chapter #35

Friar Tuck Faith
Liv Larson Andrews, Pastor, Salem Lutheran Church

Wake Up and Work: Anti-Racism for White People
Taylor Weech, PJALS Steering Committee

11:15-11:30Mixer Break

2:45-4:15 “Education for Action” Workshop Session 3 (90 min)

Building a Unified Movement: Power, Identity, & Solidarity Stina Janssen, Board member, Tenants Union of Washington, and Ingrid Chapman, United Auto Workers

Bystander Intervention Tara Dowd,  Red Fox Consulting

A Lesson on Privilege for Progressives: Why are People of Color So Angry?
Sandy Williams, Black Lens News

How to Advocate for Justice in the State Legislature Liezl Rebugio, ACLU-WA

More than Just Malice: the Most Dangerous Law in America Gabe Meyer & Reynelle Warren, Not this Time

4:15-5:00 Closing Plenary: Going Forward Together!

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What You Can Do – What He Does

This is another example of action coming out of our First Thursday Coffee discussions at the Rocket Market.

 

Submitted by Dr. Barb Brock on behalf of Anthony Stevenson, aka artist Salik Seville

Just think about what you can do to help people…
Artist Salik Seville, (aka Anthony Stevenson), originally from Memphis and a Navy veteran, has been through tough times and knows what it’s like to be homeless, but now has found his place in Spokane. Salik uses his art to showcase what he’s been going through, and offers hope for others to push through. “I just want to inspire others and do my part,” he says. “You might be having hard times or come from a hard background, but you should always think about what you can do to help people.” His work has been showcased at the downtown Spokane Library during the month of February for the past two years. Here is Anthony’s statement for 2017:
“My friends, every year I start out the New Year with an exhibition. I’ve been fortunate to have several artists join me including Denise Robinson, Sage Caberllero, Rachel Dolozal and Jay Cousin, who are contributing their time and talent to help our community.
This is something that means a lot to me. When I first started doing this it was my way of speaking through art about how I see humans. If you are in the area, come check out the art and if you see something you like, all you need is a bag of fresh food and a bag of hygiene products, i.e., hand towels, deodorant, etc to acquire a piece of art. There’s no limit. Meals on wheels and health care for homeless veterans will receive the food, and Spokane county veterans will receive the hygiene products. I will also have some paintings for sale to help the YWCA at the library here in downtown Spokane.  I would like to express my gratitude to Mrs. Barb Brock – thank you for getting involved – your help is so appreciated and will never be forgotten. Here’s to good energy, art, and action. Love can change the world.”        Salik Seville

Advice for Advocates

 Photo by Bob Lloyd from People Rise Up! PJALS

Note from Bob Lloyd: This article was originally published by the Inlander January 26, 2017. Follow the link below to see the original post. Advice for Advocates is a regular feature  by Mariah McKay.

Tips for people looking to be the change in these unprecedented times

A roar breaks out as the throng takes its first steps onto the icy streets of Spokane. While no laws or elected positions changed after last weekend’s Women’s March, an era of anemic insider-driven politics officially came to an end. If you are one of the many who feel called to take back our democracy, here are six helpful hints to heed along your journey:

FIND YOUR PLACE

You know those universe maps with a tiny arrow pointing to a dot that says “You are here?” That is you in this new mass movement. Learn about the constellations of groups already working on your issues, rather than reinventing the wheel. Don’t know where to start? Try Google or the “three degrees” approach. Ask someone who knows someone who does. Think about your unique abilities and focus on a role that plays to your strengths.

EMBRACE COMPLEXITY

It is possible for two or more things to be true at once. We are so conditioned to think in “either/or” terms, we often miss out on opportunities in between. Just because your neighbor disagrees with you on one issue doesn’t mean they won’t help you on another. Remember to not see people, organizations or institutions as monolithic.

JOY LOVES COMPANY

Some think you aren’t doing enough unless you are exhausted and miserable. This culture of stress is counter-strategic. The change we seek is a marathon and not a sprint; thus, you must sustain yourself for the long haul. Balance organizing hard with celebration and rest. People are attracted to a movement that is fun and joyous!

THINK AND ACT LOCALLY

The specter of national politics has sucked many into a cycle of emotional reactivity. Turn your existential angst into real-world action in your own backyard. Resources for engaging your congressperson, like the Indivisible Guide (indivisibleguide.com), are also relevant at the city, county and state levels. If just a fraction of the energy displayed at the Women’s March were channeled into local arenas, mountains would be on the move.

PUT PEOPLE FIRST

Revolution is the business of radical relationships. Befriend those who are different from you and find ways to celebrate your common humanity. Abandon name-calling and clever insults. Be as specific and respectful with your concerns as you can be. When reaching across a political divide, don’t immediately dive into issues. Be a person first, and you may be surprised by the friendship that will follow.

In the end, all these tips are about getting outside yourself. Ego is the ultimate enemy of an effective mass movement. Enjoy the liberation that comes with knowing you are not the only one!

Mariah McKay is a fourth-generation daughter of Spokane and a community organizer campaigning for racial, social and economic justice. She currently serves as a public health advocate.

 

Hidden Figures: A Must See for Mothers and Daughters

5,000+ women marched in Spokane. How many will bring their children to see this story?

Scroll down to see other posts from 4comculture.com

 

How I Saw: Spokane’s 8,000 Women March by Robert Lloyd

Protester’s sign read stand up! speak up! and these protesters did it this cold Spokane winter day. Some who were lucky made it to inside halls standing and sitting in the warmth and could hear the messages from the Ballroom. Others filled sidewalks for blocks east and west and entertained each other with songs, music, chatter. The Davenport Hotel Coffee and Bar was a hit place to keep warm.

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After the March People Rose Up!

Marchers continued on to the Community Building where they shared chili, soup, music, poetry, speakers, a movie, action tables, creative activities for kids and adults, and began networking to take action.

Something You Can Do                                                    Personal Actions You Can Take

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Something We Can All Do: Life Under Trump #3

 

Defend an institution. Follow the courts or the media, or a court or a newspaper. Do not speak of “our institutions” unless you are making them yours by acting on their behalf. Institutions don’t protect themselves. They go down like dominoes unless each is defended from the beginning.

Let’s Commit Ourselves

Martin Luther King Day Celebration 2017

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OK, we had our celebration with speeches and the march.

Now Let’s Commit Ourselves

Since 2008 news and social media have done nothing but complain about what politicians did and did not do. If they have not accomplished goals and objectives it is no one’s fault but your own.  If you are not satisfied with the 2016 election I suggest that you step up and do something about it.

From the list below, choose the issue you feel needs action,  list the issue and the name of an organization that works on that issue in the comment box below and fill in your contact information. If you do not know of an organization, volunteer to start such an organization. I will pass your contact information on to the appropriated organization. Also I will collate the information everyone contributes and post the results at this site 4comculture.com. To stay aware of current posts at this site in the right hand side bar SUBSCRIBE to receive an email notifying you of new posts (a couple per week).

What Will You Commit To

Protest (Civic Disobedience, Non-violent direct action, Go to jail), Government service, Social justice, Political action, Political parties (Democratic, Republican, Independent, Progressive), Employment (Jobs and training), Housing, Healthy food production, Education (K12, College), Environment (Climate change etc.) Community organizing, Social justice, Community service, Social services, Health and safety, Drug abuse prevention, Community security, Reproductive rights, Hunger, Homelessness, Race relations, Human relations, Art and culture, International affairs, Belief systems (Humanism etc.).